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School in the Time of COVID

Welcome back, itinerants! Like me, I’m sure most of you have been working throughout the summer to prepare for a school year unlike any other! I have students learning in every possible format—remote, in-person, hybrid, fully outdoors… and the list goes on. Because this year is so different, my welcome back blog post is different as well. I’ve compiled a list of resources and answers to my own Frequently Asked Questions and I’m sharing it here. Who’s ready for a whole new adventure for Fall 2020!?




 

Itinerant Teacher of the Deaf FAQ for the New School Year


1.    I’ve never even heard of that platform! How do I add captions?

There are many lists of closed and live captioning options. I’ve found these two to be the most comprehensive. As a bonus, they have both been compiled by professionals with hearing loss.

2. What masks should I recommend for my students?

There have been a variety of studies done over the summer (I participated in a few) and as with most research, there are mixed results. In the end, each student has unique learning needs and each school program has unique requirements for PPE. I’ve shared this list of resources with my schools and students to help them make informed decisions regarding masks.

 

In Support of Clear Masks:

Questioning the Efficacy of Clear Masks:

Informational Resources and Guides:

List of Companies Providing Clear Masks (not exhaustive):

3.    Eek! How do I sterilize that?

I’ve used Phonak as a resource for sterilizing protocols. If you are not on their mailing list already, I’d recommend it as they frequently send out updated information with links and resources.

 

You can read their recommendations for sanitizing Roger products here.

And the CDC and EPA have shared this list of surface disinfectant wipes that are effective against the coronavirus: 


4.    Headsets are being recommended to improve sound quality, but which one should I get?

I consulted with a colleague who has hearing loss. She recommended the Logitech H390 USB Computer Headset, with enhanced digital audio and in-line controls.


The Arctis 5 headset, made by SteelSeries, is more pricey, but comes recommend by Stacy Crouse (Instagram: @stacycrouse.slp) who has been providing remote services, exclusively, for several years. 

 

And OPTION technology professionals recommend the Willful M98 Bluetooth Wireless Headset.

 

While we are definitely going to encounter more challenges as the year progresses, hopefully we can embrace the unknowns and continue to learn together. Here’s to Fall 2020 and a completely unique school experience!

 

Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech does not endorse, recommend or provide advice for any products or vendors referenced above. Please contact the vendors directly for product information. 

 

Hear Me Out

Hear Me Out is produced by Mainstream Services at Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech as part of our mission to support children with hearing loss and the professionals who serve them.

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About the Hear Me Out Blog

Itinerant teachers of the deaf (TOD) provide direct services to children with hearing loss in mainstream schools, consultation to their teachers, and professional development to school staff. Itinerant TODs travel to a child’s neighborhood school to provide one-on-one educational support, foster listening and spoken language development, and help children build social and self-advocacy skills. They also act as a liaison between the family and their mainstream school. Hear Me Out provides a unique forum for these special teachers to share their experiences as they grow as professionals.

Hear Me Out is produced by Mainstream Services at Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech as part of our mission to support children with hearing loss and the professionals who serve them.

Hear Me Out Blog

About the Author

Heather Stinson (CAGS, MED, S/LP-A) received her master’s degree in Education of the Deaf from Smith College in 2006 and a graduate certificate in Children, Families, and Schools (with a concentration in research methodology) from the University of Massachusetts in 2012. In addition to her many years of experience working with children with hearing loss who communicate using listening and spoken language, Heather has also worked as a preschool classroom teacher.

Heather has presented both locally and nationally on issues related to mainstreaming students with hearing loss and is a contributing author to Odyssey magazine. Heather currently works as an itinerant teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing at Clarke Mainstream Services, a program of Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech.

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