Latest News

CBS3 News and KYW Newsradio Feature the Listening Walk in Philadelphia!

May 21, 2018—Clarke's Listening Walk at the Philadelphia Zoo on May 20 was an exciting day for all! It began with a 5K run, followed by a listening scavenger hunt where children with hearing loss heard their favorite "zoo-tastic" sounds—the Phillie Phanatic, the official mascot...[More]

39th Annual Conference on Mainstreaming Students with Hearing Loss: Keynotes include Alexander, Nevins, and Gardner

May 16, 2018—Clarke Mainstream Services is thrilled to announce its keynote lineup for the 39th Annual Conference on Mainstreaming Students with Hearing Loss, which will be held on October 18 and 19, 2018. This annual conference is often praised for its outstanding content, which...[More]

SOLD OUT! Clarke's Listening Walk at the Zoo in New York

May 11, 2018—Are you registered for a Clarke Listening Walk? Thanks to your overwhelming support, Clarke's Listening Walk at the Bronx Zoo reached maximum capacity this week. [More]

Clarke Audiology Assistant Pursues Doctor of Audiology Degree

May 3, 2018—Congratulations to Sarah Verteramo, Audiology Assistant at Clarke, for acceptance in the University of Massachusetts Amherst Doctor of Audiology program! [More]

 
April 27, 2012

Hearing Center to Hold Informational Sessions on Hearing Loops


April 27, 2012—Widely used in Europe and Scandinavia, Hearing Loops are an increasingly popular technology that is helping millions with hearing loss hear more clearly in public places. On Wednesday May 9, 2012, The Clarke Hearing Center on Round Hill Road will host an information session and demonstration on the benefits of Hearing Loops.

Participants are welcome to attend either the morning or evening session. The morning session will be held at 11:00 AM and the evening session will be held at 5:00 PM at the Northampton Senior Center on Conz St. Seating is limited; RSVP to audiotech@clarkeschools.org or call 413.582.1114 for more information.

ABOUT HEARING LOOPS

A hearing loop is a special amplifier connected to a PA system or TV, which transmits a magnetic signal to a wire that is installed around the periphery of a room. The signal is then picked up by people wearing hearing aids or portable headsets. The technology helps reduce background noise and makes it easier for people who are deaf or hard of hearing to access sound in noisy or crowded environments. Hearing Loops have been touted by some as the hearing loss equivalent of wheelchair ramps, due to their ability to increase the accessibility of public places. In 2011, Hearing Loops were placed in the New York City subway system, in one of the largest installations of the technology in the United States.

Additional information on Hearing Loops: “A Hearing Aid That Cuts Out All the Clatter,” The New York Times, 2011.