Latest News

Clarke Education Support Specialist Facilitates Learning Experience Presented by Hearing First

September 19, 2018—Get resources and techniques for the use of auditory-verbal strategies in Hearing First’s new learning experience led by Sherri Fickenscher, early intervention teacher of the deaf and education support specialist at Clarke Philadelphia.[More]

Clarke Supports Families Worldwide

September 5, 2018—For many Clarke families, summer travel is no excuse to pause the listening and spoken language (LSL) learning process - even when you are 8,000 miles away from your LSL professional! [More]

Clarke Helps Undergrads Gain Classroom Experience

August 30, 2018—Clarke Philadelphia is co-located on the La Salle University campus just north of the city's vibrant downtown. The "commute" for Clarke students brings them past university signage, classroom buildings and the La Salle School of Business. College students may see...[More]

Clarke New York Celebrates Year-End Accomplishments

August 21, 2018—Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech in New York celebrated the accomplishments of the Class of 2018 and the graduation of 16 students who are deaf or hard of hearing.[More]

 
April 27, 2012

Hearing Center to Hold Informational Sessions on Hearing Loops


April 27, 2012—Widely used in Europe and Scandinavia, Hearing Loops are an increasingly popular technology that is helping millions with hearing loss hear more clearly in public places. On Wednesday May 9, 2012, The Clarke Hearing Center on Round Hill Road will host an information session and demonstration on the benefits of Hearing Loops.

Participants are welcome to attend either the morning or evening session. The morning session will be held at 11:00 AM and the evening session will be held at 5:00 PM at the Northampton Senior Center on Conz St. Seating is limited; RSVP to audiotech@clarkeschools.org or call 413.582.1114 for more information.

ABOUT HEARING LOOPS

A hearing loop is a special amplifier connected to a PA system or TV, which transmits a magnetic signal to a wire that is installed around the periphery of a room. The signal is then picked up by people wearing hearing aids or portable headsets. The technology helps reduce background noise and makes it easier for people who are deaf or hard of hearing to access sound in noisy or crowded environments. Hearing Loops have been touted by some as the hearing loss equivalent of wheelchair ramps, due to their ability to increase the accessibility of public places. In 2011, Hearing Loops were placed in the New York City subway system, in one of the largest installations of the technology in the United States.

Additional information on Hearing Loops: “A Hearing Aid That Cuts Out All the Clatter,” The New York Times, 2011.