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Clarke Celebrates Revolutionary Learning at ASHA Convention

November 18, 2018—The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) convened thousands of professionals for their annual conference. [More]

Clarke Hosts EHDI Stakeholder Convening 

November 5, 2018—Clarke Northampton was the site of the Massachusetts State Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Stakeholder Meeting on October 29.[More]

Clarke SLP Co-Leads Study Indicating Cord Blood Cells May Improve Hearing in Children with Sensorineural Hearing Loss

October 2, 2018—In a recent study conducted at the Florida Hospital for Children, and co-led by Linda Baumgartner, MS, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert. AVT, speech-language pathologist and auditory-verbal therapist at Clarke Jacksonville, preliminary findings suggest an improvement in hearing in...[More]

Clarke Education Support Specialist Facilitates Learning Experience Presented by Hearing First

September 19, 2018—Get resources and techniques for the use of auditory-verbal strategies in Hearing First’s new learning experience led by Sherri Fickenscher, early intervention teacher of the deaf and education support specialist at Clarke Philadelphia.[More]

 
August 29, 2011

Article by Clarke PA's Early Intervention Coordinator Featured on AGBell Website


August 29, 2011—(text reprinted from AG Bell website) Self-advocacy in children with hearing loss will permeate many aspects of the child's life. Once it has been determined that the family's desired outcome is to have their child take advantage of the technology that is available to them, fostering self-advocacy can be woven into the routines of every day family life as well as into early childhood curriculum. As many parents of children with hearing loss will attest, the introduction of the amplification system, either hearing aids or cochlear implants, can be a frustrating time in the journey. Even though logic dictates that the more the child wears the device, the sooner the child will recognize its value, and the sooner he/she will accept the amplification and begin to embrace its use, for many families it is a difficult time.

Practicing the 3 P's can prove helpful: Persistence/Patience/Positive attitude

Persistence refers to the hundreds of times a day that the child will remove the device or it will fall off on its own.

Patience refers to the parents' ability (and willingness) to accept the fact that this is a phase and that "this too shall pass." Patience also refers to the realization that this, as with many things, is a process that will take time and effort on everyone’s part.

Positive attitude begins with you!

Positive attitude also refers to pairing early use with a positive experience.

Self-Advocacy for CI users

Self-advocacy for cochlear implant users can be developed in a similar manner. Using proper terminology for the parts of the device, encouraging the child to use it by sharing your excitement for listening and by practicing the 3 P’s, your child will soon be asking for the cochlear implant!

As with so many aspects of childhood, routine and expectation lead to predictability and security. Competence and confidence in amplification care will result in greater self-esteem about themselves and their hearing loss. It's never too early to start!

Submitted by
Jeana Novak, M.A., LSLS Cert. AVEd
Early Intervention Coordinator
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
Pennsylvania