Latest News

Former Clarke Employee Wins ASHA Editor's Award

November 14, 2017—The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) honored former Clarke employee Frank Iglehart with the Editor's Award for the American Journal of Audiology.[More]

Honoring Trustees for their Service and Welcoming a New Addition to the Board

November 13, 2017—Clarke is honored to recognize Kevin Franck, PhD, Sara Grosvenor and Sharon McCarthy as they close out their terms with Clarke's Board of Trustees this fall. Kevin, the brother of a Clarke Alumna, joined the Board in 2011; Sara, Founder and President of The Alexander...[More]

Clarke Staff and Alumni Collaborate on Educational eBook

November 5, 2017—Thanks to the contributions from Clarke staff, Smith/Clarke alumni and Clarke Board Members, we are pleased to announce that the eBook Preparing to Teach, Committing to Learn: An Introduction to Educating Children who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing, is now available...[More]

The 38th Annual Conference on Mainstreaming Students with Hearing Loss Draws Hundreds of Professionals, Parents and Teens

November 1, 2017—Clarke Mainstream Services’ 38th Annual Conference on Mainstreaming Students with Hearing Loss was a great success, drawing hundreds of attendees, sponsors and exhibitors from across the country. This year’s event was especially significant, as Clarke Schools for...[More]

 
June 8, 2011

Clarke's Bryn Mawr Campus Featured in Philadelphia Inquirer


June 8, 2011—(reprinted from the Philadelphia Inquirer) The children are busy making a paper circus train, describing their favorite animals as they go. One boy announces he likes elephants; a classmate prefers snow leopards, explaining that they are "white as snow."

It could be a preschool class anywhere, except that the group is unusually small, with just five children, and all are wearing sophisticated electronic devices in their ears.

These children, and others at the Clarke School for Hearing and Speech in Bryn Mawr, are all deaf or hard of hearing. Yet instead of using American Sign Language, all have learned to speak, in most cases aided by devices called cochlear implants. All are headed to mainstream kindergarten.

Read the full article at Phillly.com.